Nellsar Care Homes Nutritional Therapy https://nutrition.nellsar.com Tue, 06 Aug 2019 07:37:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 https://nutrition.nellsar.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/favicon.png Nellsar Care Homes Nutritional Therapy https://nutrition.nellsar.com 32 32 Homemade Lemonade https://nutrition.nellsar.com/homemade-lemonade/ https://nutrition.nellsar.com/homemade-lemonade/#respond Tue, 06 Aug 2019 07:37:53 +0000 https://nutrition.nellsar.com/?p=215017 In this hot weather, who doesn’t love a cold refreshing beverage? A favourite around Nellsar Care Homes is lemonade! So refreshing, cool and flavourful. Here is the perfect home recipe for a cool, freshly squeezed lemon drink. This makes 1 litre: 3 unwaxed lemons, roughly chopped 25 to 50grams caster sugar (depending on sweetness preferred) […]

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In this hot weather, who doesn’t love a cold refreshing beverage? A favourite around Nellsar Care Homes is lemonade! So refreshing, cool and flavourful.

Here is the perfect home recipe for a cool, freshly squeezed lemon drink. This makes 1 litre:

  • 3 unwaxed lemons, roughly chopped
  • 25 to 50grams caster sugar (depending on sweetness preferred)
  • 1 litre cold water

Method

  • Blend the lemons, sugar and half the water in a food processor until the lemon is finely chopped
  • Pour the mixture into a sieve over a bowl, then press through as much juice as you can
  • Top up with the remaining water and serve with plain ice or frozen with slices of lemon and lime
  • You can even add in some mint for extra flavour.

This is lemonade with no fizz – the old fashioned way! If you would like a fizz, then use sparkling water.

Enjoy!

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A celebration of chocolate https://nutrition.nellsar.com/a-celebration-of-chocolate/ https://nutrition.nellsar.com/a-celebration-of-chocolate/#respond Wed, 10 Jul 2019 12:33:20 +0000 https://nutrition.nellsar.com/?p=214994 The 7th July marked World Chocolate Day. It is unusual to come across a person who doesn’t like chocolate in one form or another – milk, dark, mousse, cake, ice-cream, shake, hot chocolate, chocolate covered nuts, dairy free, sugar free, the list is endless! My personal favourite is dark chocolate; I love that it has […]

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The 7th July marked World Chocolate Day. It is unusual to come across a person who doesn’t like chocolate in one form or another – milk, dark, mousse, cake, ice-cream, shake, hot chocolate, chocolate covered nuts, dairy free, sugar free, the list is endless! My personal favourite is dark chocolate; I love that it has health benefits as well as giving me a chocolate fix.

Bitter, sweet and more valuable than gold?

The cocoa bean was first documented to have been used by the Mayans. Cocoa was so highly regarded its value was worth more than gold and used as currency to trade. Chocolate was first introduced to the UK in the 1600s where the aristocracy first enjoyed it – mixing it with sugar to make it sweet, in contrast to the Mayans who would use it as a bitter drink mixed with spices, deeming it as a gift from the gods and a powerful aphrodisiac.

The Mayans knew how potent the properties of the cocoa bean were and luckily that knowledge hasn’t been lost. In fact, the health benefits of chocolate are still being utilised to this day.

Is chocolate good for us?

So why is chocolate so good for us and can we eat any type of chocolate to add in a bit of tasty (healthy) indulgence to our day?

Cocoa is the raw element to any chocolate product and the ingredient that holds all the magic! The less cocoa and the more sugar a piece of chocolate contains, the more diluted the health benefits. So, sadly, reaching for that Cadburys dairy milk or chocolate ice-cream isn’t going to be providing us with any more health benefits than a few teaspoons of sugar will.

Using a raw cocoa powder to make hot chocolate or homemade chocolate treats is the best way of obtaining the best from it. If you can’t make your own, then buying dark chocolate which is over 70% cocoa will be the right choice when considering the most beneficial chocolate option!

Cocoa contains polyphenols which are naturally occurring antioxidants and have been linked to many health benefits such as reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, lowering blood pressure, mood boost and improved brain health.

Cocoa is also a good source of minerals such as magnesium, copper and iron – helping to support the body’s energy production and overall well-being.

In celebration of the healthful use of chocolate in a cool summer treat, here is the recipe for a ‘Raw Chocolate Milkshake Miracle’ – a recipe put together by the chef and naturopath Sarah Britton, who comments;

“This recipe really does taste brownie-tastic, yet contains no unhealthy or processed ingredients, just pure plant goodness and raw cacao. Loaded with antioxidants and healthy essential omega and polyunsaturated fatty acids, this smoothie will have you singing and dancing and ready to take on your day!”

Raw Chocolate Milkshake Miracle

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup hemp seeds (or use soaked almonds, cashews, sunflower seeds etc)
  • 2 heaping tbsp raw cacao powder
  • 1 avocado
  • 1 very large frozen banana (or 2 small)
  • 2 tbsp raw honey, agave, or maple syrup
  • Dash of sea salt
  • ¾ – 1 cup water
  • 4 ice cubes


Instructions

  • Blend all the ingredients together; add water to thin if desired. It’s a thick one, folks!
  • Although the urge to chug may take over, don’t forget to ‘chew’ your milkshake for better digestion! Very important.

Source: http://rawfoodrecipes.com

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Let’s talk about keeping hydrated… https://nutrition.nellsar.com/lets-talk-about-keeping-hydrated/ https://nutrition.nellsar.com/lets-talk-about-keeping-hydrated/#respond Thu, 04 Jul 2019 10:39:10 +0000 https://nutrition.nellsar.com/?p=214986 This week, myself and two of our Nutrition and Hydration Champions attended a fantastic hydration workshop delivered by Naomi Campbell, the UK’s first Independent Hydration care nurse and consultant. Naomi is working hard to flag hydration and de-hydration so that they are recognised and monitored, in the same way nutrition and malnutrition are assessed with […]

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This week, myself and two of our Nutrition and Hydration Champions attended a fantastic hydration workshop delivered by Naomi Campbell, the UK’s first Independent Hydration care nurse and consultant.

Naomi is working hard to flag hydration and de-hydration so that they are recognised and monitored, in the same way nutrition and malnutrition are assessed with the current ‘MUST’ scoring – a five-step screening tool to identify adults who are malnourished, at risk of malnutrition, or obese.

Put the kettle on…

We looked at ‘What does a cup of tea mean to you and your residents?’. It is true that the classic cup of tea means the world to many of us and has been an inherent part of our culture since the 1600s. In residential and nursing care, tea is a lifeline for many of our residents. Our Nellsar Homes naturally offer a wide spectrum of hot and cold drinks around the clock – however, tea is a common favourite.

What ever the favourite beverage, it is important to drink enough fluid throughout the day to keep us hydrated. We should aim for 1500 mls per day.

Keeping hydrated in warmer weather

In this warm weather it is particularly important to ensure that those who are less able to help themselves to a drink are supported well to do so. Taking shots of different flavoured drinks around is a fun way to encourage a little extra fluid intake and add in ‘extra sips’ – ice lollies are also a real winner!

We should remember that fluids can also be obtained from foods! I wrote a blog last year about hydrating foods and they should certainly be encouraged and offered throughout the day. This is a good tip for carers and loved ones. If you have a relative or a resident who might prefer to eat and isn’t so interested in drinking then look at their foods and see where you might be able to add in extra hydrating foods such as fruits, vegetables, soups and salads.

Hydration and well-being

Being hydrated makes us more alert and responsive, feel fresher and helps reduce pressure sores. It also helps reduce the risk of falls, helps improve appetite, improves constipation, and reduces headaches and fatigue.

Let’s all take time to drink more – and if you’re passing someone in a care home that might be without a drink, then offer them one.

We can all be advocates of hydration!

See: www.hydrationcareconsultancy.co.uk

 

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Five to nine – healthy eating every day of the week https://nutrition.nellsar.com/five-to-nine-healthy-eating-every-day-of-the-week/ https://nutrition.nellsar.com/five-to-nine-healthy-eating-every-day-of-the-week/#respond Tue, 18 Jun 2019 09:40:36 +0000 https://nutrition.nellsar.com/?p=214967 Last week the British Nutrition Foundation celebrated Healthy Eating Week, encouraging people to eat at least 5 fruits and vegetables a day. Five was chosen as a minimum amount for the general public to aim for, when ideally 9+ portions per day is optimum. The more plant-based foods such as fruit and vegetables you add […]

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Last week the British Nutrition Foundation celebrated Healthy Eating Week, encouraging people to eat at least 5 fruits and vegetables a day.

Five was chosen as a minimum amount for the general public to aim for, when ideally 9+ portions per day is optimum. The more plant-based foods such as fruit and vegetables you add to a balanced diet, the better your overall health will be. You will have better bowel function, heart health and skin. You should also feel less tired and be able to stave off many illnesses more easily.

It isn’t always easy to know how to add in fruits and veg to the diet if it isn’t something you are used to doing. Knowing what is counted as a portion, and whether to eat mostly fruit over vegetables or vice versa, might not be so obvious.

How to reach your 5 a day and beyond

The first rule of thumb is to make sure that your 5 to 9+ per day is made up of mostly vegetables. Fruits can be very high in sugar and although they are rich in vitamins, minerals and fibre, you should be eating a ratio of 2 fruit to 3 veg for your 5 a day, or 3 fruit to 6 veg for your 9 a day, and so on.

A portion size is around 80 grams. So that might be 3 heaped tablespoons of vegetables (raw, cooked or frozen), a dessert bowl of salad, or 3 heaped tablespoons of pulses (such as lentils, beans or peas).

A portion of fruit would look like:

  • One banana, apple, pear, orange, or similar sized fruit
  • Half an avocado or large grapefruit
  • A slice of large fruit such as pineapple or melon
  • Two satsumas, plums or similar sized fruit
  • A handful of grapes, berries, or cherries
  • One heaped tablespoon of dried fruit such as raisins or apricots, or three heaped tablespoons of fruit salad or stewed fruits

See: www.healthyperformance.co.uk

How to add in fruit and veg to your day

There have been numerous studies proving the benefit of an increased consumption of plant foods. Even making a small change from no fruit and veg to one or two portions is a great start and will have positive effects.

Breakfast

Think about breakfast, what do you eat? If it’s porridge, you can add in some of your favourite berries or perhaps some grated apple, or even a blended homemade apple sauce or berry compote could be a tasty addition. If you prefer a cereal, then any fruit can be added in.

If it’s toast that you like, then a hand full of rocket or wilted spinach with your eggs and toast can fit in well. Or if you are more of a ‘toast and spread’ person, then how about having a fruit salad on the side in a separate bowl?

Snacks

For snacks, you could include humous, cut up pepper, carrots, celery and cucumber.

Lunch and dinner

With lunch and dinner, you can really go to town on the vegetables! Have as many and as much as you like – roasted, stir fried or steamed – or have a large salad added in or on the side.

Experiment with variety and eat as many different colours in a week that you can – red, yellow, orange, purple and green. Just remember that white potatoes aren’t counted as one of your five a day!

Click on the British Nutrition Foundation poster below for further tips and information…

 

 

 

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High calorie smoothies – National Smoothie Day, Friday 21 June https://nutrition.nellsar.com/high-calorie-smoothies-national-smoothie-day-friday-21-june/ https://nutrition.nellsar.com/high-calorie-smoothies-national-smoothie-day-friday-21-june/#respond Wed, 12 Jun 2019 09:38:35 +0000 https://nutrition.nellsar.com/?p=214949 Maintaining a healthy weight is important for our elderly population. It makes recovery from illness easier and helps us to remain stronger. Sometimes, due to illness or a heatwave, a person’s appetite can decrease and the need for extra calories in the diet is advantageous. If food isn’t appetising then smoothies are a great way […]

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Maintaining a healthy weight is important for our elderly population. It makes recovery from illness easier and helps us to remain stronger. Sometimes, due to illness or a heatwave, a person’s appetite can decrease and the need for extra calories in the diet is advantageous. If food isn’t appetising then smoothies are a great way to add in calories, vitamins, minerals and hydration.

To make the perfect high calorie smoothie you need a few base ingredients. Once you have these you can play around with the flavours as much as you like without going too far wrong – ie coffee, chocolate, strawberry, mango, peanut butter, banana…. you name it you can make it!

For a dairy base, here are some calorific ingredients:

  • Double cream – 100mls (458 kcals)
  • Dried milk powder – 57gms (201 kcals)
  • Full fat milk – 125mls (79 kcals)
  • Vanilla ice-cream – 3 scoops (244 kcals)
For a dairy free base:
  • Dairy free ice-cream (Swedish glace) – 100mls (91 kcals)
  • Sweetened soy milk/almond milk – 250mls (56 kcals)
  • Coconut milk (can) – 400mls (676 kcals)
  • Oat cream – 100mls (150 kcals)
  • Creamy oat fraiche – 100gms (177 kcals)
For extra calories you can add:
  • Nut butters – 1 heaped teaspoon 18gs (117 kcals)
  • Dates – 60gms (194 kcals)
  • Avocado – ½ medium (139 kcals)
  • Coconut flour – 50gms (176 kcals)
  • Ground flax seed – 2 tbl spoons (160 kcals)
  • Oats – 50gms (182 kcals)
  • Cashew nuts – 100gms (573 kcals)
  • Banana – medium (100 kcals)
  • Protein powder – 1 scoop (100 kcals)
  • Olive oil – 1 tbl spoon (123 kcals)
  • Coconut oil – 1 tbl spoon (120 kcals)

High calorie smoothies

Oaty banana shake
  • 250mls of non-dairy milk or full fat milk
  • 250mls of oat cream or double cream
  • 250gms rolled oats
  • 1 tbl spoon honey
  • Cocoa powder to taste

Banana oat shake

Strawberries vanilla surprise
  • 250 mls almond milk or full fat milk
  • 3 scoops vanilla ice cream dairy free or dairy
  • 2 cups of strawberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 2 tablespoons of honey
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Strawberries and vanilla smoothie

Peanut butter and chocolate twist
  • 250mls of non-dairy or full fat milk
  • 1 banana
  • ½ avocado
  • 2 scoops chocolate protein powder
  • 1 cup ice cream dairy or non dairy (preferably similar flavour to the protein powder)
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 cup oats
  • 4 tbsp peanut butter

Peanut butter and chocolate twist smoothie

 Banana, peach and mango burst
  • 2 ripe bananas
  • ½ can or half a fresh peach
  • ½ small mango
  • 250mls dairy free or full fat milk
  • 3 tablespoons (or more) oat cream / oat fraiche or double cream
  • 3 ice cubes or a scoop of ice-cream if so desired!

Tropical banana shake

Next Friday, 21 June, is National Smoothie Day – so now you are fully prepared!

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Diabetes and the benefits of a Mediterranean diet https://nutrition.nellsar.com/diabetes-and-the-benefits-of-a-mediterranean-diet/ https://nutrition.nellsar.com/diabetes-and-the-benefits-of-a-mediterranean-diet/#respond Wed, 05 Jun 2019 11:58:55 +0000 https://nutrition.nellsar.com/?p=214940 Diabetes is a condition that causes a person’s blood sugar to become too high and can be a risk factor for various complications if not treated properly. It is common for the elderly to present with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. This can be well controlled by diet and support from those surrounding them.   There are two main types of […]

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Diabetes is a condition that causes a person’s blood sugar to become too high and can be a risk factor for various complications if not treated properly. It is common for the elderly to present with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. This can be well controlled by diet and support from those surrounding them.  

There are two main types of diabetes

Type 1

Often this is genetic and affects around 8% of the population. The pancreas is an organ that produces insulin. Insulin is a hormone that carries glucose (or sugar) from the blood into the cells to be used as energy.

Type 1 diabetes means that the body’s immune system has attacked its own pancreatic cells preventing them from producing insulin. Therefore, someone with type 1 diabetes is insulin dependent and will need to inject themselves with insulin daily to control their blood sugar, allowing glucose from food to be used as energy in the cells.

Type 2

This type affects 90% of people with diabetes. Type 2 is typically caused by too much glucose from food and drinks entering the body over sustained periods of time.

The pancreas releases insulin every time we eat. If our meals are high in sugars (processed foods high in refined carbohydrates, breads, pastry, chocolate, pasta, white potato and sugary drinks, including diet sodas) then the pancreas must work harder to release more insulin to keep up with demand.

This can result in either the pancreas becoming over-worked and eventually stopping to produce enough insulin to keep up with demand, or the cells stopping responding to the insulin wanting to bring the glucose into the cells to be used for energy.

Mediterranean diet

The Mediterranean way of eating has been well studied in recent years and has shown to be the most effective for overall well-being and helping to control Type 2 diabetes.

The main principles being:

  • Eat natural, unprocessed foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains and nuts
  • Eat only small amounts of dairy
  • Make olive oil your primary source of dietary fat – cold pressed virgin olive oil!
  • Reduce the consumption of red meat (monthly)
  • Eat low to moderate amounts of fish (weekly)
  • Drink a moderate amount of wine (up to one to two glasses per day for men and up to one glass per day for women)

See: www.mediterraneandiet.org.uk

The benefits are vast. Helping with cardiovascular health, cognitive function, reduced hip fractures, reducing blood pressure, cholesterol and of course helping to prevent or to control Type 2 diabetes.

Low sugar / carbohydrates

It is still possible to enjoy foods whilst remaining mindful about blood sugar spikes. Adding protein to meals and snacks and making sure there is plenty of fibre in the diet are two ways of buffering glucose releasing into the blood stream.

Desserts are often an area of confusion. There is no need for somebody to miss out if portion sizes are controlled; a little piece of something sweet is often ok after a meal and experimenting with low carb desserts can also help.

This time of year whipped cream and strawberries is the perfect diabetic-friendly dessert!

Our Nellsar Homes can easily support anyone who wants to be more mindful about their continued health and maintaining a healthy weight and I am always on hand to sit and have some one-to-one time with any resident who wishes to discuss meal planning. 
 

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Eating and drinking with Dementia https://nutrition.nellsar.com/eating-and-drinking-with-dementia/ https://nutrition.nellsar.com/eating-and-drinking-with-dementia/#respond Tue, 04 Jun 2019 12:13:44 +0000 https://nutrition.nellsar.com/?p=214932 Alzheimer’s is a very complex disease which presents itself differently for each person. As with most things in life, a ‘one size fits all‘ approach just doesn’t work. We are all so unique and that doesn’t change for people experiencing dementia. In fact, a personalised approach becomes even more important when supporting people with cognitive […]

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Alzheimer’s is a very complex disease which presents itself differently for each person. As with most things in life, a ‘one size fits all‘ approach just doesn’t work. We are all so unique and that doesn’t change for people experiencing dementia. In fact, a personalised approach becomes even more important when supporting people with cognitive impairment.

People with dementia often experience problems with eating and drinking. There are a vast number of reasons why this might happen and lots of ways in which to support someone experiencing a lack of appetite. It is important for the carer to take a step back and ask themselves what the cause could be and how they can best help a person to eat.

Mealtime tips and ways of encouraging appetite

Environment

The mealtime environment is incredibly important. Typically, it needs to be calm and inviting, music should be soft and no TV on in the background. The table should be free of clutter as this can be confusing and a distraction for some people with dementia. Be aware of the other people in the room – is it too loud and busy?

What were a person’s eating habits in years passed? Were they part of a large family and enjoyed the hustle and bustle, or did they live in a quite household and used to eating alone or with just one other person?

Food

If a person with Dementia is experiencing some form of visual disturbance, then it might be difficult for them to distinguish and separate colours which are similar. For example, mash potato and chicken on a white plate with a white tablecloth has no contrast and doesn’t help the meal stand out or look appetising. Using blue plates has been shown to help with this.

Here is an example of what a scampi, potato croquettes and vegetable meal might look like. Can you also see the lack of contrast in the white plate and white tablecloth? The meal on this plate stands out well here. However, some meals wouldn’t.

Creating meals that not only smell and taste great, but look visually appealing too is a key factor. If the taste buds aren’t working as well as they did then try to appeal to the other senses by making a meal look appetising and smell great.

Don’t be scared of trying new flavours. Perhaps the stronger flavours are more appealing now. I have known ladies in their 80s who have never liked Indian style food previously, to thoroughly enjoy a chicken curry in their dementia stage. Have taste testers with different foods, smoothies and drinks. Try adding herbs and spices to foods for the extra flavour.

Having the smell of baked bread or fresh coffee in the room can stimulate someone’s appetite.

It is also important not to overload the plate too much. Smaller portions often seem more manageable to people – and remember you can always fill the plate up wit a second and third portion if it is going down well!

Problems with co-ordination

If someone is struggling with co-ordination there is a variety of adaptable equipment (such as easy hold cutlery or raised rim plates) which might make the mealtime an easier task for those eating with difficulty.

Or trying finger foods! Most cuts of meat, vegetables and potato can be picked up by hand, as can fruits. You could even have dishes with gravy or beans to dip the finger foods in on the side.

Make mealtimes enjoyable!

To make the mealtime an enjoyable experience, make sure people are eating meals they like in an environment that suits their social and emotional needs. Ensure that the people around them are supportive and relaxed and that mealtimes are never rushed. And independence is promoted as much as possible!

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Being Vegetarian in residential care – Celebrating National Vegetarian Week https://nutrition.nellsar.com/being-vegetarian-in-residential-care-celebrating-national-vegetarian-week/ https://nutrition.nellsar.com/being-vegetarian-in-residential-care-celebrating-national-vegetarian-week/#respond Tue, 14 May 2019 10:41:46 +0000 https://nutrition.nellsar.com/?p=214923 This week is National Vegetarian Week (13-19 May). Organised by the Vegetarian Society, and supported by celebrities such as Stephen Fry and Joanna Lumley, it is an opportunity to spend a week celebrating the diversity and flavour that a vegetarian diet can offer. Vegetarians and vegans in residential care The Vegetarian Society recently surveyed 1,000 […]

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This week is National Vegetarian Week (13-19 May). Organised by the Vegetarian Society, and supported by celebrities such as Stephen Fry and Joanna Lumley, it is an opportunity to spend a week celebrating the diversity and flavour that a vegetarian diet can offer.

Vegetarians and vegans in residential care

The Vegetarian Society recently surveyed 1,000 care homes to find out how many residents are vegan or vegetarian. Since the survey was last commissioned in 2014, the number of vegans in residential care has increased by a whopping 167%!

They go on to explain in this month’s Veg Society Newsletter that many vegetarians and vegans genuinely fear being fed meat should they lose capacity. Being vegan or vegetarian is often central to a person’s identity and may be the strongest belief that they hold. It might be something that someone has committed to for many years – even decades. It is our responsibility as a Care Provider to ensure that the people we are catering for receive the variety and choice they deserve.

Protein and plants

We all know that protein is an important part of a balanced diet. It is even more important when people are recovering from an illness or operation. What is less commonly known is that protein doesn’t have to come from meat, and can be found in an abundance of plant foods. Nuts and nut butters, tofu/tempeh, leafy greens (spinach, kale, broccoli, beans), black beans, pinto, adzuki, mung beans, turtle beans and green peas are all full of protein.

A protein is a large molecule which is made up from amino acids. Meat (including fish) and eggs often have the complete set of amino acids we require. Vegetables and other plant proteins do not contain a full set when eaten in isolation or even when sticking to the same one or two choices. The trick is to ensure you are eating a full spectrum of plant protein foods every day, that way all the amino acids required will be balanced and available in the diet.

Commitment to vegetarianism

Many of the menus throughout our Nellsar Homes offer a vegetarian choice as a standard second option. This means we are providing for vegetarian diets, or people who simply fancy a meat-free day, and ensures we are already prepared for our prospective vegetarian residents who are yet to join us.

Nellsar is also a member of Vegetarian for Life who are a charity dedicated to supporting vegetarians in later life.

One of my favourite vegetarian meals is Aubergine Parmigiana. It is on the menu at one of our Homes and the residents love it! I can’t wait to go and try it! Here is a recipe taken from BBC Good Food:

Aubergine parmigiana

Ingredients

For the aubergine:

  • 2 large aubergines, sliced into thin slices about a 5mm/¼in thick
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 100g/3½oz ricotta
  • 100g/3½oz Parmesan, grated (or alternative vegetarian hard cheese)
  • 100g/3½oz mozzarella, sliced
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the tomato sauce:

  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 red onion, finely chopped
  • a good splash olive oil
  • 2 x 400g tins chopped tomatoes
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • 125ml/4fl oz red wine

Method

  • Brush the aubergine slices with olive oil on both sides to coat. Heat a griddle pan and cook the aubergines for a couple of minutes on both sides until lightly browned. Set aside while you get on with the tomato sauce.
  • Heat a large frying pan. Fry the garlic and onion with a little oil until soft. Add the chopped tomatoes, oregano and wine. Simmer for about 15 minutes, or until the sauce thickens.
  • Preheat the oven to 220C/200C Fan/Gas 7.
  • In a medium-sized roasting tin, spread a little tomato sauce over the bottom of the tin. Add a layer of aubergine slices and spread another layer of tomato sauce on top.
  • Spread half the ricotta on the top and sprinkle with Parmesan, salt and pepper. Continue to repeat the layers until all the aubergine is used. Finish with a layer of mozzarella slices topped with a final sprinkle of Parmesan. Bake for 25 minutes.
  • Serve the parmigiana hot with a salad alongside.

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The magic of culinary herbs https://nutrition.nellsar.com/the-magic-of-culinary-herbs/ https://nutrition.nellsar.com/the-magic-of-culinary-herbs/#respond Wed, 08 May 2019 10:37:38 +0000 https://nutrition.nellsar.com/?p=214909 Herbs are one of my favourite additions to any meal. I love the flavour and colour they bring. I also love that we can grow herbs in pots, on our windowsills, or in our gardens with relative ease. They are full of nourishment, taste good and smell great! Just by adding fresh herbs to a […]

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Herbs are one of my favourite additions to any meal. I love the flavour and colour they bring. I also love that we can grow herbs in pots, on our windowsills, or in our gardens with relative ease. They are full of nourishment, taste good and smell great!

Just by adding fresh herbs to a meal we increase the nutritional value and antioxidant capacity, without adding in calories or increasing the portion size. As I have mentioned in previous blogs, antioxidants are incredibly important for health. Found in most if not all fresh fruits, herbs, spices and vegetables, antioxidants are powerhouses of molecules that safely interact with and ‘mop up’ harmful free radicals which can cause damage to our cells.

For the elderly, often the taste buds diminish so more flavourful additions such as herbs and spices enable food to have some ‘zing’ and interest again.

I could share information about the medicinal properties of culinary herbs all day long and I encourage our kitchens to use them where ever possible.

Here is a taster of three easy growers that are also easy to find in the shops. See just how beneficial our little flavourful friends can be! All you need to do is chop them up finely and throw them into your cooking, add them into salads or simply use them as a topper or seasoning to any meal or snack.

Chives

  • Laboratory studies show that chives contain the antioxidant allicin which reduces cholesterol production by inhibiting an enzyme in the liver cells. Allicin also decreases blood vessel stiffness and can help reduce total blood pressure.
  • Chives are also found to have antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-fungal activities.
  • Comprising more vitamin-A than any other allium family member vegetables, 100 g of fresh leaves contain 145% of daily recommended levels.
  • Anti-oxidant compounds within chives offer protection from lung and oral cavity cancers.
  • Packed with B-complex vitamins as well as some essential minerals such as copper, iron, manganese, zinc, and calcium.

Oregano

  • Oregano contains an impressive list of plant-derived chemical compounds that are known to have disease preventing and health promoting properties and are a rich source of dietary fibre, which helps to control blood cholesterol levels.
  • The herb is rich in polyphenolic flavonoid antioxidants (including vitamin A) and has been rated as one of the plant sources with highest antioxidant activities. These compounds help act as protective scavengers against oxygen-derived free radicals that play a role in ageing and various disease processes.
  • The active principles in the herb may improve gut motility.
  • This marvellous herb is an excellent source of minerals like potassium, calcium, manganese, iron, and magnesium. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps control heart rate and blood pressure caused by high sodium. Iron helps prevent anaemia. Magnesium and calcium are essential minerals for bone metabolism.

Rosemary

  • Rosemary herb carries great amounts of vitamin A, around 97% of RDA. A few leaves a day in the diet would contribute enough of this vitamin. Vitamin A is known to have antioxidant properties and is essential for vision. It is also required for maintaining healthy mucosa and skin. Consumption of natural foods rich in vitamin A is known to help the body protect from lung and oral cavity cancers.
  • Fresh rosemary leaves are a good source of antioxidant vitamin C, containing about 37% of RDA. It is essential for collagen synthesis in the human body. Collagen is the main structural protein in the body required for maintaining the integrity of blood vessels, skin, organs, and bones. Regular consumption of foods rich in vitamin C helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents (boosts immunity) and help scavenge harmful, pro-inflammatory free radicals from the body.
  • Rosemary herb parts, whether fresh or dried, are a rich source of minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, manganese, copper, and magnesium. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids, which helps control heart rate and blood pressure.

So next time you chop up those chives or reach for the rosemary – remember how amazing they are!

Herb facts taken from: www.nutrition-and-you.com

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Creating top quality soft foods using piping techniques https://nutrition.nellsar.com/creating-top-quality-soft-foods-using-piping-techniques/ https://nutrition.nellsar.com/creating-top-quality-soft-foods-using-piping-techniques/#respond Tue, 30 Apr 2019 09:11:23 +0000 https://nutrition.nellsar.com/?p=214896 Nellsar’s Executive Chef and Mentor, Adrian Silaghi, has been showing Nellsar’s kitchen staff a range of methods of food presentation, for those of our residents who are on a texture modified diet. We understand that the presentation of these meals is very important for our residents, to help stimulate their appetite and enhance their dining […]

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Nellsar’s Executive Chef and Mentor, Adrian Silaghi, has been showing Nellsar’s kitchen staff a range of methods of food presentation, for those of our residents who are on a texture modified diet.

We understand that the presentation of these meals is very important for our residents, to help stimulate their appetite and enhance their dining experience. The challenge faced with a texture modified diet is maintaining beautiful presentation and great flavour.

Adrian and his team have worked hard to develop the quality and appearance of soft food meals with innovative technology that allows them to shape it to its initial, attractive form.

Adrian has recently been demonstrating how to maintain appealing presentation by using piping techniques to recreate the original shape of food. From salads, to cheese boards and desserts, his demonstration plates show just what can be achieved with the clever use of piping. The flavours have been enhanced by using herbs, spices and sauces. Simple yet effective!

 

 

 

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